Tag Archives: Ian Tregillis

Superheroes vs. Warlocks, Part III

In the first two books of Ian Tregillis’ Milkweed triptych (Bitter Seeds and The Coldest War), a clairvoyant madwoman by the name of Gretel was Nazi Germany’s greatest weapon. Said the author: “She was a prophet, an oracle, a sear. … Continue reading

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Superhero Novels: The Best of 2012 and a Peek at 2013

Looking back, 2012 was a big year for superhero novels. It produced some interesting debuts (A Once Crowded Sky by Tom King and Prepare to Die! by Paul Tobin), a couple of long-awaited sequels (The Coldest War by Ian Tregillis, and … Continue reading

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Superheroes vs. Warlocks, Part II

It’s 1963 and England and the Soviet Union are locked in an uneasy cold war. At the end of WWII, the Soviets stole Germany’s prized Willenskräfte technology and have now successfully transformed its Red Army into an injustice league of … Continue reading

Posted in Published in 2012 | Tagged , ,

Superhero Novels: The Best of 2011 and a Peek at 2012

When someone discovers SuperheroNovels.com for the first time, they inevitably ask the same question: Are there enough superhero books being written to support a blog? The truth is we struggle mightily to keep abreast of all the novels that are … Continue reading

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Superhero Novels: The Best of 2010 and a Peek at 2011

Masked, a collection of straight-up superhero stories was the best book of 2010. So sayeth SuperheroNovels.com. Each of the contributing authors fearlessly embraced the tropes of superhero fiction and successfully expanded the genre’s horizons. Hats off to the project’s editor … Continue reading

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Superheroes vs. Warlocks, Part I

It’s WWII. The Germans have supermen, and the English have warlocks. Game on! During the years between the first and second World Wars, Germany creates the Institute of Human Advancement (Institut Menschlichen Vorsprung) to explore the possibility of “Germanic potential.” … Continue reading

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